Top Priority

AHRQ’s Fatally Flawed
Comparative Outcomes Review 240

Use arrows at the bottom of the documents to tab through the pages.

AHRQ-Cover-Letter-Jan-20-2021.docx

AHRQ-Methodological-Errors-Final-Jan-2021.docx

Comments-on-AHRQ-Review-for-Acute-Pain-September-2020.docx

Urgent Action item

Contact the House Committee on Government Oversight and Reform

It’s time to act! Get in touch with your Congressional Reps and tell them that the House Committee on Government Oversight and Reform MUST order the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to immediately withdraw its “Comparative Outcomes Review 240” for treatment of acute pain on the grounds of unjustified anti-opioid bias and gross, fatal errors.

Click here For More info AND A Sample Call Script


Fact-Sheet-on-Prescription-Opioid-Pain-Relievers-in-the-Opioid-Crisis.docx

Red on the Dr. Peter Breggin Hour – Sept 23, 2020

Listen to the show on PodBean

Red’s KOGO radio interview––July 23, 2020

 

COMMENT TO THE CDC DOCKET 2020

Comment-to-CDC-Docket-2020-V1.1

 

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TOP PRIORITY


The War on Pain Patients

Contrary to popular belief, doctors over-prescribing opioids did not cause our drug crisis, nor does it sustain its steady climb. According to CDC’s data, nearly half of all overdoses don’t involve prescribed opioids at all. Among the remaining drug-related deaths in 2017, half involved illicit fentanyl and heroin. Only about 18,000 deaths involved a prescription opioid, and most of those also involved multiple illegal drugs and alcohol. 

The National Institute on Drug Abuse says most addicts begin to abuse drugs in their teens or early 20s. Contrast that with pain patients on opioid therapy, the majority of which are over age 55. Seniors are prescribed opioids three times more often than youth under age 18, yet somehow seniors have the lowest overdose rates of any age group, and youth overdose six times more often. Prescriptions aren’t the problem.

Restricting pain medication to pain patients won’t stem the tide of illicit fentanyl and heroin overdose deaths. Forcing pain patients off the only medications that work, providing no alternatives, and driving those same patients to street drugs and, increasingly, to suicide won’t help either. 

Lawmakers must direct their attention to the real problem–the rising tide of illicit street drugs–and stop persecuting pain patients, the most vulnerable among us.


Red’s Body of Work

Forewarned is forearmed.

Read up so you’re ready to counter any false claims with hard facts.

Rev 01/21